Decision 2008

October 22, 2008
Filed under The Plug

Proposition 1

A YES vote on this measure means that the state could sell $9.95 billion in general obligation bonds to plan and to partially fund the construction of a high-speed rail system in California and to make capital improvements to state and local rail services.
A NO vote on this measure means that the states could not sell $9.95 billion in general obligation bonds for these purposes.

Proposition 2

A YES vote on this measure means that beginning in 2015, state law would prohibit, with certain exceptions, the confinement on a farm of pregnant pigs, calves raised for veal and egg-laying hens in a manner that does not allow them to turn around freely, lie down, stand up and fully extend their limbs.
A NO vote on this measure means that state law would not contain prohibitions specifically concerning the confinement of pregnant pigs, calves raised for veal and egg-laying hens.

Proposition 3

A YES vote on this measure means that the state could sell $980 million in general obligation bonds for the construction, expansion, remodeling, renovation, furnishing, equipping, financing or refinancing of children’s hospitals.
A NO vote on this measure means that the state would not sell the $980 million in general obligation bonds proposed for these purposes.

Proposition 4

A YES vote on this measure means that the state constitution would be changed to require that a physician notify, with certain exceptions, a parent or legal guardian of a pregnant minor at least 48 hours before performing an abortion.
A NO vote on this measure means that minors would continue to receive abortion services to the same extent as adults. Physicians performing abortions for minors would not be subject to notification requirements.

Proposition 5

A YES vote on this measure means that drug treatment diversion programs available primarily for persons charged or convicted for a nonviolent drug possession crime would be expanded. Some parole violators would be diverted from state prison and parole terms would be reduced for others. New rehabilitation programs would be expanded for offenders before and after they leave prison. Some inmates might receive additional credits to reduce the time they stay in state prison. Possession of less than 28.5 grams of marijuana would have a lesser penalty than under current law.
A NO vote on this measure means that state and local governments would determine whether to expand existing drug treatment diversion programs in the future. The state would not be obligated to further expand rehabilitation programs for inmates, parolees and other offenders. The current rules for awarding credits to inmates to reduce their time in prison would continue. The penalty for possession of less than 28.5 grams of marijuana would remain unchanged.

Proposition 6

A YES vote on this measure means that the state would be required to increase spending for specified state and local criminal-justice programs to at least $965 million in 2009-10. This is an increase of $365 million, and there will be more increases in future years. Sentences also would be increased for certain crimes – such as crimes related to gangs, methamphetamine sales and vehicle theft – resulting in more offenders being sent to state prison and for longer periods of time. The measure would make various other criminal- justice changes related to such things as parole agent caseloads and use of hearsay evidence.
A NO vote on the measure means that the state legislature and governor would continue to have current authority over the state funding levels provided for specified criminal- justice programs. Criminal penalties would not be increased. Parole caseloads and use of hearsay evidence would remain unchanged.

Proposition 7

A YES vote on the measure means that the electricity providers in California, including publicly owned utilities, would be required to increase their proportion of electricity generated from renewable resources, such as solar and wind power, beyond the current requirement of 20 percent be 2010, to 40 percent by 2020 and 50 percent by 2025, or face specified penalties. The requirement for privately owned electricity providers to acquire renewable electricity would be limited by a cost cap requiring such acquisitions only when the cost is no more than 10 percent above the a specified market price for electricity. Electricity providers who fail to meet the renewable resources requirements would potentially be subject to a 1 cent per kilowatt-hour penalty rate set in statute, without a cap on the total annual penalty amount.
A NO vote on this measure means that electricity providers in California, except publicly owned ones, would continue to be required to increase their proportion of electricity generated from renewable resources to 20 percent by 2010. The current requirements on privately owned utilities to purchase renewable electricity would continue to be limited by an annual cost cap on the total amount of such purchases. Electricity providers would continue to be subject to the existing penalty process, in which the penalty rate (currently 5 cents per kilowatt-hour) and a total annual penalty cap (currently $25 million per provider) are set administratively.

Proposition 8

A YES vote on the measure means that the California Constitution will specify that only marriage between a man and woman is valid or recognized in California.
A NO vote on this measure means that marriage between individuals of the same sex would continue to be valid or recognized in California.

Proposition 9

A YES vote on this measure means that crime victims would have additional constitutionally guaranteed rights, such as the right to participate in any public criminal proceedings. Payments of the restitution to crime victims would be required without exception, and any funds collected from offenders ordered to pay restitution would go to pay that obligation before any other. Inmates with life sentences who were denied parole would generally have to wait longer before being considered again for release. Some parolees facing revocation and return to prison may no longer be represented by legal counsel. Early release of inmates to reduce prison or jail overcrowding would be restricted in certain circumstances.
A NO vote on this measure means that victims will continue to have the statutory right to be notified of certain criminal justice proceedings, such as sentencing and parole proceedings. Whether victim restitution would be ordered would remain subject to a judge’s discretion, and the manner in which money collected from defendants is distributed would remain unchanged. All parolees would continue to be entitled to receive legal representation at parole hearings. State and local governments could take steps to release inmates early to reduce jail and prison overcrowding.

Proposition 10

A YES vote on this measure means that the state could sell $5 billion in general obligation bonds for various renewable energy, alternative fuel, energy efficiency and air emissions reduction purposes.
A NO vote on this measure means that the state would not sell $5 billion in general obligation bonds for these purposes.

Proposition 11

A YES vote on this measure means that boundaries for State Senate, Assembly and Board of Equalization districts would be drawn by a new commission made up of California registered voters. Boundaries for the U.S. House of Representatives districts would continue to be drawn by the Legislature.
A NO vote on this measure means that boundaries for State Senate, Assembly, Board of Equalization and U.S. House of Representatives districts would continue to be drawn by the Legislature.

Proposition 12
A YES vote on this measure means that the state would be able to issue $900 million in general obligation bonds to provide loans for the veterans’ farm and home purchase (Cal-Vet) program.
A NO vote on this measure means that the state would not be able to issue these bonds for this purpose.

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