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Suicide Prevention Resources

Christina Benavides, Copy Editor

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There are many resources for suicide prevention, and one of my newest findings are crisis hotlines that are online or through text. I believe this way is efficient to those who might not be the greatest at communicating on the phone. Also, this benefits those in the deaf community that are struggling with mental illness and need a way to contact a professional for help.

Our society today is heavily independent on social media, which makes people more connected to each other through the internet. This goes hand in hand with the crisis hotlines being online, making them available to anyone, and it’s worldwide.

The different crisis hotlines provide something for every type of person. For example, it’s possible that a person might not use a telephone, but have access to the internet. Most libraries provide an internet source for free so the availability of these hotlines online make it more likely for people to seek help.

Let’s be honest, we all have busy lives. We don’t have time to call someone on a hotline for over an hour, but with live chat lines, and texting lines there are more options. There is an online chat support line called “Lifeline Chat” and it is located on suicidepreventionlifeline.org. According to the site, a live counselor gives you advice and provides you with helpful resources. The chatline supports over 150 languages, which benefits most people who decide to use it.

From my experience using a crisis hotline, I did feel like I got help after speaking to someone. I went into the call feeling distressed and upset. Towards the end of the call, I definitely felt better. It helps to vent about what you’re going through with someone to avoid you feeling worse later. There is a huge difference in your overall mood when you confide in someone and let everything out. A weight slowly lifts off your shoulders. Your problems aren’t gone, however you feel understood and listened to. I strongly recommend if you aren’t seeing a mental health professional or taking medication for your mental illness to reach out to a crisis hotline.

If you’re more into apps, there are several on your app store, depending on if you have an android or apple device. One that i find helpful is called TalkLife. I have been using it for almost a year now, and you can either write posts anonymously or post directly from your profile. The app is very active, and normally you will get help from other members of this community if you ask for it. Something that i specifically like about this app that a crisis hotline does not have is a community of people who either are there to solely help or to be helped because they are dealing with mental illness. I think it’s important to talk to people who understand what you’re dealing with because for most people, it makes you feel less alone.

You can also list on your profile whether you’re on the app to help people or get help. I have had great experiences with getting help from people on there, and it felt good to have a person listen to me vent out all my frustration. I have also helped others, which is also rewarding itself.

There is also a section where they list helpline numbers on the app, including a button to make an emergency call.

I believe any crisis hotline is good for you if you need to talk to someone. Even if you’re feeling suicidal, it will help. You can even ask to speak to a different counselor if you feel uncomfortable. Don’t hesitate to call a crisis hotline if you need to.

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Suicide Prevention Resources