The Renegade Rip

BlacKkKlansmen boasts surprising humor and lightness through a dark film

The way Spike Lee directed the film was seamless with their use of background noise, music, fade-ins and fade-outs, and locations for filming.

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Bryana Lozoya, Reporter

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“BlacKkKlansman” is a great movie and worth the money. 

The film is based off Ron Stallworth’s memoir, with the same title, about his time as an investigator which details his infiltration of the local Ku Klux Klan chapter in Colorado along with some undercover work in the Black Panthers. 

This movie not only highlights the true story of Ron Stallworth (played by John David Washington), a black former police investigator for Colorado Springs Police Department, but also highlights issues of racism and hate crimes faced in his time and ones still happening today. 

There are many fantastic things about the movie, such as their music choice, which featured songs like “Mary Don’t You Weep” by Prince and “Oh Happy Day” by Edwin Hawkins. 

The casting was well done with notable actors such as Adam Driver, Michael Buscemi, and Alec Baldwin. 

There was never a dull moment in the film—it will keep you on the edge of your seat the entire time. 

However, based on stereotype and race, some actors acted in a cliché manner that ended up annoying and distasteful. One that was notable was a character who acted like the stereotypical uneducated racist hillbilly. 

The background actors were dressed too similarly to the point that they all blend together and bring the assumption that one race all act or think the same, but perhaps that was director Spike Lee’s intention as an emphasis for the movie to highlight the racism and conflict between black and white people. 

This movie has plenty of good things to offer viewers. The way Spike Lee directed the film was seamless with their use of background noise, music, fade-ins and fade-outs, and locations for filming. To put it simply, it was pleasing to the eye and easy to follow along as a movie viewer.

The quality of the acting and choice of music played throughout the movie was amazing. The way Lee integrated the two together evoke feelings ranging from anger and despair to hope and joy at the appropriate moments. 

“BlacKkKlansman” is a film that will definitely make viewers feel deeply. Each main actor embodied their character accurately and in such a compelling way that one could almost forget they’re watching a movie.

One surprising factor in the film was the humor presented. The trailer portrayed the film as suspensful and serious, but that wasn’t the case. The humorous moments came at appropriate times and was not overdone. 

The ending to the “BlacKkKlansman” is unique in of itself and was quite intense. Lee, presumably, added the things he did to spark outrage and debate.

It was an “in your face” scene that makes moviegoers leave the theater reminded of the darker periods of modern American history in the hopes of inspiring change and outrage at those moments.

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BlacKkKlansmen boasts surprising humor and lightness through a dark film