Op-ed: “Uncut Gems” is a must see

Olivia Patterson, Reporter

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Adam Sandler plays Howard Ratner, an epic and unforgettable role in the wide released film “Uncut Gems.” He plays a delusional and adorably optimistic jeweler.  The film was created and directed by Josh and Benny Safdie and Ronald Bronstein. It’s definitely the best two hours and fifteen minutes of any film this year. The film was nominated for best director at the New York Film Critics Circle Awards, best actor at the National Society of Film Critics and best film at the Broadcast Film Critics Association among other nominations such as best editing and breakthrough actor for 2019. It was also commercial success, and grossed $47 million at the box office.

The film is full of chaos, family drama, crime, thrills, and some comedic moments throughout. The decisions he makes and the consequences of his actions keep you wondering what’s about to happen next.

Howard Ratner, is a married man with two children, of Jewish heritage and an unprofessed gambling addiction. He lives in the New York City’s chaotic diamond district and is always looking for the biggest and next score. He wins big by obtaining a rare Ethiopian opal that was discovered in a mining accident in 2010. This jewel was mined by one of the poorest countries with the poorest people, Ethopian Jews.

In the film, the black opal is set to auction off at $1,000,000, clearing his debts with loan sharks. However, one of his high-profile buyers, spots the black opal and wants to use it as a good luck charm for his basketball game. He insists and Howard reluctantly agrees. It then becomes a series of bad choice after bad choice that has you wondering throughout the whole movie if he’s ever going to get his life together.

The movie does bring to light what addiction looks and feels like. You can feel the pain he goes through and the high of the big stakes he takes and lives off of till the next big score. He doesn’t consider himself an addict and it’s never mentioned in the film, but you can clearly see the delusion and unwavering tunnel vision he has in order to win and win big with no intention of stopping.

There are some comedic moments but mostly it’s a dark tragic film with an amazing cast ensemble and no down time. The pace of the movie starts right up in the beginning as a chaotic mess all the way up until the very end of the movie.

Overall, this movie deserves at least a 4 out of 5 and is definitely a must see.